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One Thing

As an IBM (Introvert Boomer Male), I am dedicated to maximizing my health, wealth, and relationships while enjoying life. Before the end of the year, I will return to the life of perpetual travel.

My “goal” is to be on the road by my birthday – September 14th. I’m laying my plans online to give me social media accountability. I have started many reboots without success, and I’m getting too near the end of life to keep giving up.

Like many people, I suffer from best laid plans syndrome. Most people limit it to New Year’s Resolutions, but I prefer starting on my birthday as my fiscal year. I am giving myself until my next fiscal year begins to clean up my blood sugar, get back to walking and the gym, and to create an online recurring income.

Therein lies the problem. Too many goals. The problem is the list. Each of these objectives are hurt by not concentrating on one objective.

One thing.

Without creating a full-time recurring income, I cannot pursue perpetual travel except on a Peace Corps subsistence level. My one big thing for 123 days will be to master affiliate marketing.

Now, that will mean many things. Review sites. Mailing lists. SEO. Video marketing.

And more.

I find myself in a situation where I am a less than adequate caregiver. My time gets usurped by the needs of others. What this means for me is that I am shifting my most productive work hours to early morning.

As long as I awake sometime between 3:30 a.m. and 5:30 a.m., I can muster 3 to 5 hours of work time without being interrupted.

Most corporations get about a 5-6 hours of actual production each day out of employees. I plan to have that under my belt way before lunch. This way, no matter what life throws at me, it’s already been a good day.

I do a ton of reading in local bookstores – Barnes and Noble and Books-a-Million. I consider them the public libraries. (I do have coffee to pay “rent” on the books I scan.)

A number of recent reads focus on the one thing that should guide your life. Multitasking does not work, and dreaming about 10 major goals is like chasing 10 rabbits at one time. You won’t catch any.

My life theme is to become a perpetual traveler again. My preferred lifestyle is waking up in a new city every few days. With any luck, there’s a new woman waking up with me.

The one thing this requires is a full-time online income. You need to be able to work from anywhere in the world with a wifi connection. Another priority is building a recurring income with a membership site of my own, or as an affiliate promoting membership sites of others. Or both.

Any health and relationship goals are not ignored, but without the income, those are severely hampered.

Streams of Income That Appeal to Me:

1. affiliate marketing
2. article marketing
3. review sites
4. blogging
5. writing books
6. list marketing
7. membership sites

Developing full-time anywhere, anytime income usually requires multiple streams of income, but I need to develop them one at a time to not lose focus. Also, if you want to be a blogger, you have to monetize with selling your own products or those of others.

I’m not saying don’t develop multiple streams, but just develop additional streams for now as needed to contribute to the main job.

Technically, you don’t need a list to sell affiliate products, but a stupid mistake is to not create a list from day one. You don’t have to sell anything until you are ready. What you do is find like-minded fellow travelers to share information in your niche.

I have been creating too many blogs and not developing what needs to be my personal focus: iPerpetualTraveler

That one blog should be enough to keep me busy forever. For the next 123 days, I will put my other blogs on curated growth so they don’t go stale.

Affiliate marketing is the ideal way to start your journey to perpetual travel. Eventually, you want to create your own products – books and membership sites – to gain control over your own destiny. But you want to learn online marketing by promoting other people’s goods and services. Make your mistakes on someone else’s dime.

Knowing what to do is important. Knowing what not to do is maybe even more important.

What I should avoid:

1. creating unrealistic “hard” goals that concentrate on results instead of the process
2. not including breaks and fun in the routine

For example, as a writer, I would sometime put a minimum target of writing 2,000 words per day minimum. Some days, it’s not going to happen. Suddenly, you’re a “failure” instead of missing an artificial number.

If instead, your goal is to improve your main blog or website every day, you will keep the search engines coming back to index the changes.